$18 Boston Gear CSSC37 Clamping Shaft Collar, Stainless Steel, 0.375 Power Transmission Products Couplings, Collars Universal J Shaft Collars Steel,,Gear,Clamping,CSSC37,Power Transmission Products , Couplings, Collars Universal J , Shaft Collars,0.375,rousseau-2012.net,Shaft,Collar,,$18,Boston,Stainless,/kerogen389310.html $18 Boston Gear CSSC37 Clamping Shaft Collar, Stainless Steel, 0.375 Power Transmission Products Couplings, Collars Universal J Shaft Collars Boston Gear CSSC37 Clamping Shaft 0.375 Steel Collar Stainless SEAL limited product Steel,,Gear,Clamping,CSSC37,Power Transmission Products , Couplings, Collars Universal J , Shaft Collars,0.375,rousseau-2012.net,Shaft,Collar,,$18,Boston,Stainless,/kerogen389310.html Boston Gear CSSC37 Clamping Shaft 0.375 Steel Collar Stainless SEAL limited product

Boston Gear CSSC37 Clamping Shaft 0.375 Steel Collar Stainless SEAL limited product Oakland Mall

Boston Gear CSSC37 Clamping Shaft Collar, Stainless Steel, 0.375

$18

Boston Gear CSSC37 Clamping Shaft Collar, Stainless Steel, 0.375

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Product description


This Boston Gear one-piece clamping shaft collar is made of stainless steel 303. It is a one-piece clamping shaft collar for applications requiring a more uniform holding power and higher axial load capacity than setscrew collars. It is easier to remove and reposition than setscrew collars and is effective on both hard and soft shafts. It is made of stainless steel 303 for greater resistance to corrosion than steel or aluminum. This collar comes with socket-head cap screws for securing the collar onto the shaft. The operating temperatures for this collar range from -35 to 176 degrees C (-32 to 350 degrees F). This shaft collar is suitable for use in various applications, including in the automotive industry to situate components in automobile power steering assemblies, the manufacturing industry to locate components on a conveyor belt system, and the hobby craft industry to hold wheels on axles in remote control vehicles, among others.
Shaft collars are ring-shaped devices primarily used to secure components onto shafts. They also serve as locators, mechanical stops, and spacers between other components. The two basic types of shaft collars are clamping (or split) collars, which come in one- or two-piece designs, and setscrew collars. In both types, one or more screws hold the collars in place on the shaft. In setscrew collars, screws are tightened through the collar until they press directly against the shaft, and in clamping collars, screws are tightened to uniformly compress the collar around the shaft without impinging or marring it. Setscrew collars and one-piece clamping collars must be installed by sliding the collar over the end of the shaft, while two-piece clamping collars separate into two halves and can be installed between components on the shaft. Shaft collars are made from a wide range of materials including zinc-plated steel, aluminum, nylon, and neoprene.

Boston Gear CSSC37 Clamping Shaft Collar, Stainless Steel, 0.375

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